Scientific Program

IASPEI Symposia

Program Details
As of June 23, 2017

IASPEI01 Seismological Observation and Interpretation

S01 Open session

Convener: (Kiel University, Germany)
Co-convener: Domenico Di Giacomo (International Seismological Centre, UK), Aitaro Kato (Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, Japan)

Description

Essential for seismology is the rapid and reliable detection, location, and magnitude estimation of seismic events based on effective data retrieval, data archiving and analysis. Presentations are invited for the following topics:

  1. Developments in seismic networks and data centers, international data exchange and management of massive data sets.
  2. Analysis of errors in onset time readings. Automated determination of onset times for crustal, mantle, and core phases including their uncertainties.
  3. Location of seismic events and developments in new location techniques like reverse time migration and multiple event location techniques. Estimation of location uncertainties using ground truth events.
  4. Developments in array techniques for the detection and location of events as well as for measurements of seismic wavefield attributes.
  5. Estimation of magnitude, energy and moment of seismic events at various scales.
  6. Determination of seismic source parameters from analogue recordings.
  7. Analysis of earthquake catalogues with respect to their completeness, homogeneity, uncertainties, magnitude-frequency distribution, and spatio-temporal distribution of events.
  8. Propagation and inversion of seismic waves

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S02 Anthropogenic seismicity

Convener: (Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland)
Co-convener: Carlos Alberto Vargas Jimenez (Universidad Nacional de Colombia at Bogota, Colombia), Hiroshi Ogasawara (College of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Japan), Harsh Gupta (National Geophysical Research Institute, India)

Description

The phenomenon of anthropogenic seismic activity is an unwanted rockmass response to technological processes. With rising demands for energy and minerals this type seismicity appears in areas previously known as aseismic and in association with quite diverse technological processes. The induced or triggered earthquakes accompany underground and open-pit mining, conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon production, reservoir impoundment, geothermal energy production, underground fluid and gas storage including carbon sequestration and many other technological processes that perturb the boundary conditions in the affected rockmass. The socio-economic impact of the triggered and induced seismicity is very significant. On the one hand, these events, though being small compared to tectonic earthquakes, because of their shallowness are often damaging and occasionally devastating. On the other hand, the hazards associated with triggered earthquakes can be and are often overrated. It is clear that vital technological activities can lose public confidence unless the accompanying seismic risks are accurately assessed and properly presented to public. Finally, earthquakes whose origin, whether natural or anthropogenic, is under debate, pose questions that need to be answered with high certainty. The goal of this session is to recognize the severity of the anthropogenic seismicity world-widely, and to summarize the present state of knowledge about these seismic processes. We welcome both cross-sectional multi-aspect theoretical, methodical and experimental studies as well as interesting case histories linked to particular inducing technologies. The session is meant, among others, to help in identifying common areas of seismic processes induced by different technologies. Consideration on the predictability and controllability of anthropogenic earthquakes are especially invited.

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S03 Imaging of heterogeneities in the Earth with seismic scattered waves and ambient noise

Convener: (Tohoku University, Japan)
Co-convener: Ulrich Wegler (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Germany)

Description

Seismic scattered waves or coda waves carry rich information on heterogeneities of the Earth. For example, the spatial distribution and the frequency dependence of the strength of scattering attenuation and intrinsic absorption in the Earth have been estimated from amplitude information of coda waves. Recently ambient noise cross correlation has also been used to study seismic structure in the Earth thanks to the development of seismic interferometry. Moreover, time-lapse imaging or monitoring of the Earth has been conducted using tiny changes in phase information of coda waves and ambient noise cross correlation. In order to advance these studies, following studies would be necessary: theory and observations of wave propagation in realistic heterogeneous media including scattering and attenuation, coda wave and full envelope analysis, generation mechanisms and characteristics of ambient noise, theoretical and practical studies on seismic interferometry, temporal change in medium velocity and heterogeneity, and so on. We would like to widely invite presentations related to the above subjects.

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S04 Historical and macroseismic studies of earthquakes

Convener: (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Milano, Italy)
Co-convener: Kenji Satake (Earthquake Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan)

Description

Instrumentally reliable data on earthquakes, depending on the area of the world, span no more than a century, too short a period to grasp effectively the seismic history of a region. Historical and macroseismic data, as opposed to instrumentally recorded data, contribute expanding backwards in time our knowledge of the seismic behaviour of an area, to the point that they are today widely recognised by the seismological community as crucial, especially in seismic hazard related studies. Researchers dealing with the interpretative processes of deriving seismological data from diversely originated and –originally- non-seismological observations of earthquake effects are invited to present case histories derived from their own experience. In addition to a discussion on how macroseismic effects on people and buildings are collected and processed, considerations on how the data - derived both from written accounts and in situ geological investigations - of effects on the natural environment is treated, are invited. Finally, we welcome suggestions from emerging, fresh looks at how favouring an interdisciplinary approach may result in an exhaustive reappraisal of individual earthquakes or the seismicity of an area.

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S05 Preservation and usage of analog seismogram archives

Convener: (Columbia University, New York, USA)
Co-convener: Graziano Ferrari (INGV, Rome, Italy), Emile Okal (Northwestern University, USA)

Description

Seismology as an observational science is based upon studies of ground motion from earthquakes and explosions that were successfully documented by analog recording methods for about eighty years, prior to the emergence of digital recording in the 1960s and 1970s. We ask: how can archives of analog seismograms be turned into a usable resource in the digital era, which today permits sophisticated methods of analysis that cannot directly be applied to the earlier types of recording?

We note that the time-scale of earthquake occurrence in different regions has often required examination of ground motions recorded over periods far longer than the three or four decades for which digital documentation is available. Concerning research on explosions and how well nuclear testing can be monitored by seismological methods, we note (1) that almost all such explosions in the atmosphere, at the surface, and underwater, took place prior to the modern era of digital recording; and (2) that there are far more analog recordings of underground nuclear explosions at regional distances, than digital.

Vast archives of analog seismograms exist in many different countries, that have developed different practices on how such archives should be treated. Specific efforts at scanning and digitizing key datasets have been successful, and such efforts at data rescue need to be communicated to institutions responsible for unused archives. Basic documentation on what data exist and what can be accessed, is hard to find. Very few seismologists who received their training since the 1980s have practical experience of working with analog seismograms. Seismologists who were trained in the 1970s or earlier and are still active, face a daunting task in developing ways to bring out the relevant information recorded in the past, for study using the methods that future generations of seismologists will surely develop. Opportunities for interaction between those familiar with analog seismograms, and modern analysts, will not last indefinitely. Can we develop consensus on what subsets of analog data should be saved, if such data cannot all be kept indefinitely?

Presentations are invited to this special session, that bring out scientific results derived from analysis of analog seismogram archives, and/or assessments of management issues related to the production of scientific results. Following the session a panel will discuss key steps needed, to plan and coordinate the work of extracting and circulating useful information from analog seismogram archives.

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S06 Advancement in methodologies for CTBT monitoring

Convener: (NORSAR, Norway)
Co-convener: Michelle Grobbelaar (Council for Geoscience, South Africa), So Gu Kim (Korea Seismological Institute, Korean Republic), Stephen C. Myers (Livermore, CA, USA), Nurcan Meral Ozel (Vienna, Austria), David Jepsen (Vienna, Austria)

Description

The waveform networks (seismic, infrasound and hydroacoustic) of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verifying compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) together currently consist of more than 200 high-quality stations distributed worldwide. Data from these stations has become a very important asset in the development of methods and the performance of experiments related to nuclear explosion monitoring, as well as for basic earth scientific studies. In this session we call for papers focusing on recent research and developments in seismology and seismoacoustics advancing the capability to monitor compliance with the CTBT. Examples include analysis of seismic and infrasound signals from the DPRK nuclear explosions, absolute and relative event locations, improvement in seismic velocity models, event characterization and identification, processing methods for arrays, three-component stations and networks, as well as specific field experiments.

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IASPEI02 Earthquake Hazard, Risk and Strong Ground Motion

S07 Strong ground motions and earthquake hazard and risk

Convener: (Building Research Institute, Japan)
Co-convener: John Clinton (ETH Zürich, Switzerland), Massimiliano Pittore (GFZ Potsdam, Germany), Masumi Yamada (Kyoto University, Japan), Jamie Steidl (UC Santa Barbara, USA)

Description

Dense networks with high quality strong motion sensors, often incorporated alongside broadband seismic or GNSS instrumentation, are now the norm in many regions of the world, with continuous data available with minimal latency for a wide variety of applications.

These recordings are allowing to improve seismic hazard calculations both for long term planning and for real time assessment and rapid response. Furthermore, the development of innovative tools for assessing exposure and to follow its dynamic are offering new opportunities for a better assessment of earthquake risk.

This symposium solicits contributions that describe novel instrumentation and (permanent or temporary) network approaches that include strong motion monitoring, and real-time or off-line data processing and dissemination strategies that interpret strong motion records. Significant results of studies dealing with seismic hazard and risk assessment (including real time applications) by innovative approaches and methodological improvements are particularly welcome as well as those performed at regional, national or site-specific scale.

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S08 Paleoseismology and paleotsunami studies: their potential and limitation

Convener: (Hiroshima University, Japan)
Co-convener: Masanobu Shishikura (Geological Survey of Japan, AIST, Japan), Xiwei Xu (Institute of Geology, CEA, China)

Description

Geologic and historic studies on past large earthquakes and tsunamis are the keys to know the hazards in the future and to prepare for them. A lot of data on paleoearthquakes and paleotsunamis have been acquired and are applied for hazard assessments and the assessments have been tested by actual events. The 16 April 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, for example, was a successful case for rupture and slip forecast but timing had not been constrained. On the other hand the 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Tohoku earthquakes and tsunamis were far beyond our knowledge at the time of the occurrence. These experiences urge paleoseismology to evaluate its potential and limitation and explicitly announce them. This session invites the latest worldwide researches on paleoearthquakes and paleotsunamis with reflection and perspective for better hazard assessments. The contributions on the investigation on actually occurred earthquakes and tsunamis recently with reference to pre-event studies are much encouraged.

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IASPEI03 Earthquake Generation Process

S09 Open session: Earthquake generation process - physics, modeling and monitoring for forecast

Convener: (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece)
Co-convener: Alexey Zavyalov (Institute of Physics of the Earth RAS, Russia), David Rhoades (GNS Science, New Zealand), Naoshi Hirata (Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, Japan)

Description

It is known that the process of destruction is not a momentary act, but there is a process taking place in time and space. In preparation of macro-destruction destruction process is going through a number of levels (stages), starting with the micro-scale and ending on macro-scale, including earthquake focal area. In this symposium, we invite researchers to discuss the results and directions for further researches on the physics of seismic process - from experiments in laboratory conditions, rock bursts in mines and in seismically active regions during the preparation of strong earthquakes.

Special emphasis will be given to quantitative physical models of the seismic process at different scales, observations on earthquake triggering by other earthquakes or nearby faults, and synchronization between nearby faults with positive stress coupling, fault system interactions controlling earthquake occurrence, the connection of smaller magnitude seismicity with stress changes as expressed through the Rate/State model, calculation of stress changes from changes in earthquake occurrence. Modeling and simulations across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales provide a better understanding source processes and interactions, and advance predictive capabilities.

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S10 Development, testing and application of earthquake forecasting models

Convener: (GNS Science, New Zealand)
Co-convener: Antonella Peresan (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale, Italy), David Jackson (University of California Los Angeles, California, USA), Kosuke Heki (Hokkaido University, Japan)

Description

The provision of authoritative information about the future occurrence of potentially damaging earthquakes requires the development, testing and application of earthquake forecasting models. Model development is being facilitated by the improvement of potential data and modelling inputs. Long-term models, which have previously relied mainly on earthquake and fault data inputs, can now be enhanced by the inclusion of strain–rate estimates derived from geodetic data. Medium Eand short–term models can also entertain inputs from geodetic data, models of stress accumulation and space–based geophysical observations. Some studies of proposed earthquake precursors are advancing from the anecdotal stage to the model development stage. Many proposed models are being prospectively tested by the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability in a variety of regions and on a variety of timescales. There is on-going discussion about which consistency and comparative tests should be used. Methods have been proposed for forming hybrid forecasting models from several existing models and/or input data streams. Long-term models are widely applicable in seismic hazard analysis. Short-term and hybrid models have been applied to inform communities during recent mainshock–aftershock sequences. The form, in which authoritative information about future earthquake occurrence should be disseminated, in order to enhance earthquake preparedness in threatened communities, is an important issue. We invite contributions on all these aspects.

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S11 Geo & space technologies to study pre–earthquake processes: Observation, modeling, forecasting

Convener: (Center of Excellence in Earth Systems Modeling & Observations (CEESMO), Chapman University, USA)
Co-convener: Katsumi Hattori (Department of Earth Sciences, Chiba University, Japan), J.Y Liu (Institute of Space science, National Central University, Taiwan), Masao Nakatani (Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, Japan)

Description

Session will primarily concern the interdisciplinary observations of earthquake processes and our further understanding of the physics of earthquakes and the phenomena that precedes their energy release. Based on interdisciplinary studies session would provide new evidence about possible coupling between our planet's environment with its lithosphere, which provides a better understanding of the physics of earthquake and earthquake cycles. The session anticipates talks that include but not limited to observations, modeling and analyses of seismic, geochemical, electromagnetic, and thermodynamic processes related to stress changes in the lithosphere along with their statistical and physical validation. Presentations on the latest developments in earthquake predictability and prospective testing associated with major earthquakes are welcomed.

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S12 An interdisciplinary approach towards earthquake prediction studies

Convener: (Chapman University, Orange, USA)
Co-convener: S. Pulinets (Space Research Institute, RAS, Russia), Katsumi Hattori (Department of Earth Sciences, Chiba University, Japan), J.Y. Liu (Institute of Space science, National Central University, Taiwan), Q. Huang (Department of Geophysics, Peking University, China)

Description

This session expands the discussions on earthquake predictability by presenting the latest validation of cross-disciplinary physical signals associated with the major earthquakes. It advances the existing studies on earthquake phenomena towards integration in a common interdisciplinary approach to understand better the earthquake processes. This approach could provide some new evidences about the existence of pre-earthquake signals, which may help for the better understanding of global tectonics and volcanic activities. The topics of the session are as follows but not limited:

  • Discussion on the physics of earthquake preparation processes;
  • Theory, laboratory experiments, computational simulation for generation and propagation of pre-earthquake signals;
  • Seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, electro-chemical and thermodynamic observations of pre-earthquake processes and their connection with seismic cycle.

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IASPEI04 Earthquake Source Mechanics

S13 Earthquake source mechanics

Convener: (Univ. Tokyo, Japan)
Co-convener: Hideo Aochi (BRGM, France), Simone Cesca (GFZ Potsdam, Germany), Torsten Dahm (GFZ Potsdam, Germany), Yuji Yagi (Tsukuba Univ., Japan)

Description

Recent high-quality seismic and geodetic observations provide large volume of data, which enabled accurate determination of earthquake locations, size, and source parameters including moment tensors, and detailed imaging of earthquake rupture processes, with the aid of improvements in various techniques solving inverse problems. Abundant information from these analyses is the basis to study diversity of seismic activity including swarms and triggered events, and to seek governing laws and conditions for rupture initiation and growth, and is also useful to estimate the stress state, fault geometry, and fluid movement around seismic regions. Entire earthquake process from long-term tectonic loading and slow nucleation to rapid rupture propagation with strong motion radiation is now recognized using numerical simulations. The validity of assumptions in these simulations is tested by the data analysis and laboratory experiments, which are also supported by several drilling projects. In this symposium, we invite contributions from data analysis and interpretations for earthquake parameters and source process, improvement and validation of routine analysis techniques, theoretical and numerical modeling for dynamic ruptures and seismic cycles, and observational and experimental works for the physics of earthquakes. Studies of giant earthquakes including recent events such as the 2015 Nepal (Mw 7.8), Illapel, Chile (Mw 8.3), 2016 Kumamoto, Japan (Mw 7.0), and Central Italy (Mw 6.2) earthquakes will be also important topics in this symposium.

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IASPEI05 Earth Structure and Geodynamics

S14 Upper mantle and transition zone dynamics and structure

Convener: (University Münster, Germany)

Description

The main features of the upper mantle and transition zone are the seismic discontinuities that define it. The discontinuities are believed primarily due to phase changes in the olivine component of the peridotitic mantle, and to a lesser extent from non-olivine components. The radial structure is disrupted by plumes and subducted lithospheric slab material that can often be imaged tomographically. Scattered waves seen in the coda of direct arrivals indicate the presence of smaller scale heterogeneities as well. Both the large-scale and small-scale structure are products of the dynamical evolution of the mantle but also of mineralogical variations. We welcome contributions to this session from observational and theoretical seismology, geodynamics and mineral physics that yield insights into the upper mantle's dynamical processes and composition.

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S15 Mid-mantle structure

Convener: (Tokyo Institute of technology, Japan)

Description

The mid-mantle, roughly corresponding to the region extending from 800 - 2000 km depth, is enigmatic since the signals detected by seismic tomography are weaker and lack the vertical and radial coherence observed in the transition zone and lowermost mantle. Although relatively seismically quiet, the mid mantle regulates the material transfer from surface plate tectonics and the thermal (chemical?) boundary at the core-mantle interface. Recent advancements in seismic imaging, dynamic modeling, and mineral physics have found signals in the mid mantle such as scattered wave arrivals, viscosity contrasts, and the iron electron spin transition which provide new opportunities to examine Earth's convective history. In this session, we invite observations and modeling from seismology, geodynamics, geochemistry and mineral physics regarding the mid-mantle's present state and its role in Earth evolution.

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S16 Large low shear velocity provinces and deep mantle structure

Convener: (Michigan State University, USA)

Description

Large low shear velocity structures (LLSVPs) are characteristic of seismic wavespeeds in the lowermost mantle. They comprise a few percent of the volume of the Earth and thus are a significant component of its structure. LLSVPs exhibit features suggesting that they are compositionally different to the bulk of the mantle, though their origins are unclear. In this session, we invite contributions from observational seismology, geodynamics and mineral physics with the aim of understanding the locations, origins and behavior of LLSVPs.

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S17 Outer core structure and dynamics

Convener: (Tokyo Institute of technology, Japan)

Description

The outer core is believed to be liquid iron-nickel alloy with around 10 wt% of additional light elements such as Si, C, S, H, P or N. While its density and wavespeed profile is very close to being one of a homogeneous composition in uniform self-compression, recent seismological studies suggest lower wavespeeds near the core-mantle boundary and the inner core boundary. In this session we invite contributions bearing on the chemical homogeneity of the outer core. Contributions from seismology, geomagnetism, core dynamics, mineral physics, geochemistry and experimental petrology are welcome.

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S18 Inner core structure

Convener: (Australian National University, Australia)

Description

The inner core crystallizes from the liquid iron alloy of the outer core, yet its seismic structure is complex. Wavespeeds in it are anisotropic with a strength and possibly an orientation that varies radially. Multiple datasets confirm quasi-hemispheric modulation of bulk wavespeeds in the top several hundred kilometres of the inner core, which, to date, is the most robust seismological observation. The inner core boundary has been shown to have complex lateral variations, possibly due to topography and lateral variations in crystallisation. The recent attenuation studies converge on a more complex lateral variation than purely hemispheric. The complex structure reflects both the present thermochemical conditions in the core and its dynamical evolution after crystallisation in the past. We invite contributions in this session from seismology, core dynamics, geomagnetism and mineral physics that bear on inner core structure and evolution.

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S19 Planetary seismology

Convener: (IPGP, France)
Co-convener: Bruce Banerdt (JPL, USA), Taichi Kawamura (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan RISE Project, Japan), Patrick Gaulmes (New Mexico University, USA)

Description

Since the historical Apollo 11, seismology is no longer limited to Earth. The success of the Apollo Passive Seismic Experiment generated a variety of seismic investigations even 40 years after the end of the Network operation. The seismic lunar structure, including core, mantle and crust as well as the detection of Tidal triggered Deep Moonquake and high energetic seismic impacts are a few of these discoveries. More recently, normal modes have been detected on Jupiter and ring's structures associated to Saturn's normal modes have been detected. Last but not least, the Insight mission, focused on seismology, will be launched in 2018 to Mars and seismology might also be considered for the exploration of Europa and Venus for future missions.

The goals of this session are to present the state of the art in planetary seismology, either for the analysis of data from Apollo and Giant planets, or for the modeling of seismic signals and seismic sources on all solar system planets and small bodies. Presentations on existing space qualified seismic instruments, new instrumental or mission concept will also be welcome.

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S20 Earth and planetary space and remote sensing seismology; i.e., seismology without seismometers

Convener: (GEOAZur, France)
Co-convener: Kosuke Heki (University of Hokkaido, Japan), Elvira Astafyeva (IPGP, France), Philippe Lognonné (IPGP, France)

Description

This session will present recents observations and modelling of Quakes generated Waves détected without seismometers and will includes measurement of seismic waves by GPS in the ionosphere, airglow for tsunami, and other technics in Earth and Planetary seismology.

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IASPEI06 Tectonophysics and Crustal Structure

S21 Lithospheric structure

Convener: (Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic)
Co-convener: Shun Karato (Yale University, USA), Juan Carlos Afonso (Macquarie University, Australia), Ulrich Achauer (Institut de Physique du globe de Strasbourg, France), Kevin P. Furlong (Park University, USA)

Description

The aim of this multidisciplinary symposium is to bring together scientists working in the fields of observational and theoretical seismology, electromagnetism, geodynamics, tectonics, mineral physics, experimental petrology, modelling and geochemistry to present their achievements in various studies of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system, to stimulate interdisciplinary discussion and interpretations of the results. Contributions presenting results on

  • Scales of the lithosphere and upper mantle heterogeneity and anisotropy. Regional and global studies
  • Origin and imaging of the mantle lithosphere discontinuities (Moho, MLD, LAB, etc.)
  • Advantages and resolutions of different inversion methods for studying the deep Earth structure
  • Models of anisotropic fabrics of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system resulting from ancient and recent processes
  • Dynamics of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system from multi-observable probabilistic tomography
  • Constraints from textures in xenoliths and exposed mantle sections
  • Constraints from laboratory studies
  • Constraints from geodetic observations (e.g., post-seismic deformation, slow slip events)
  • Mechanical interactions between the lithosphere and asthenosphere
  • The role of water in the development of anisotropy
  • Relationship between surface tectonics and the underlying mantle flow
  • The future of geophysical imaging,

achieved with the use of different technique, are preferably welcome. Special attention will be paid to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), the most extensive and active plate boundary on the Earth, which remains, particularly beneath continents, relatively cryptic compared to other first-order structural subdivisions of Earth. Determination of the LAB depth and answers on what the LAB means from the structural, rheological and physico-chemical point of view remains highly debated and represents a first-order problem in the geosciences. Only multi-disciplinary and/or transdisciplinary efforts, bringing together various disciplines from the Earth Sciences, can shed light on the above questions and lead to i) a better understanding of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system, ii) unravel what the LAB truly is, iii) how it evolves, iv) how it can be better imaged, and v) what role it has played and still plays in the evolution of our planet.

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S22 Lithosphere structure and dynamics: Plate boundary deformation at lithospheric scale (co-sponsored by the International Lithosphere Program (ILP))

Convener: (Park University, USA)
Co-convener: Rob Govers (Utrecht University, The Netherlands)

Description

The goal of this symposium is to bring together scientists who are observing and modeling plate deformation, with an emphasis on plate boundary processes. We are interested in both modern (e.g. GPS, InSAR, Seismologic, etc.) rates and patterns of plate boundary deformation and also the geologic record of past deformation in and near plate boundaries, including paleoseismic studies. Topics of interest include (but are not limited to): partitioning of deformation along plate boundaries, permanent versus ephemeral deformation, near-surface versus deeper rates and patterns of deformation, role of rheology in localizing/diffusing plate boundary deformation, and related topics. We welcome contributions from all styles of plate boundary deformation, i.e. subduction, rifting, and translational.

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IASPEI07 Education and Outreach

S23 Geoscience and society

Convener: (Keio University, Japan)
Co-convener: Akihiko Ito (Utsunomiya University, Japan), Fushin Lee (Kyoto University, Japan), Alessandro Amato (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Italy)

Description

For better or worse, geoscience has impacts on the society. Geological phenomena such as earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, or subsidence are of strong concern to the public especially in disaster-prone countries. This can be an advantage for geoscientists in outreach and education while other basic sciences first need to make efforts in publicity activities of their existences. Geoscience may also get special consideration in the share of the budget.

On the other hand, geoscientists are often accused for the damage caused by disasters. In some cases, this accusation arouses public distrust in geoscience or geoscientists. The public over-expectation in forecasting or predicting geohazards should be scaled back to an appropriate level corresponding to the realistic of geoscience, and this is one of the purposes of the outreach and education.

In this session, we widely report the communication with the public -- either school kids, mid- and high school students, undergraduate students, or the grownups -- regarding geoscience and geohazards. Science communication to build a familiarity to basic science can be an important candidate. We also welcome risk communication activities to empower the public to be prepared to the future disasters.

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IASPEI08 International Heat Flow Commission

S24 Methods and instruments of experimental geothermics - application and recent evolution

Convener: (Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Russia)
Co-convener: Andrea Förster (Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, GFZ German, Germany)

Description

Experimental geothermics is a basis of fundamental investigations of the Earth's thermal regime and different applications in applied science and industry. Representativeness of geothermal databases, reliability of theoretical modeling, role of basic geothermics in wide spectrum of Earth's sciences, efficiency of applied geothermics depend on quality of experimental methods and instruments and reliability of experimental geothermal data. Different aspects of experimental geothermics will be discussed within the session program. The session will address the following topics:

  • Advanced methods and instruments for determination of temperature and temperature gradient in wells;
  • Technique for determination of equilibrium temperature gradient from temperature measurements in drilled and shut-in wells and application results;
  • Possibilities of optical-fiber technique for temperature measurements in wells;
  • Determination of 3D variations of rock thermal properties accounting for anisotropy and multi-scale heterogeneity;
  • Laboratory technique for thermal property measurements at in-situ conditions and measurement results;
  • Rock thermal property measurements in wells;
  • Measurements of rock thermal properties on high porous and fractured rock samples, weakly consolidated rock samples, and core cuttings;
  • Determination of rock thermal properties from standard petrophysical logging data;
  • Experimental data on correlations between thermal and other physical properties of rocks;
  • Experimental databases on rock thermal properties accounting for lithology, porosity, pore fluid properties, rock anisotropy, in-situ conditions, etc.;
  • Determination of heat production;
  • Metrological testing of instruments for measurements of temperature, temperature gradient and rock thermal properties as necessary stage in experimental geohermics;
  • Recording vertical variations in conductive heat flow;
  • New applications of experimental geothermics related to problems of geothermal energy and hydrocarbon recovery.

Other contributions related to experimental geothermics are also invited.

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S25 Development and application of geothermal databases

Convener: (Institute of Global Environmental Change, Xi'an Jiaotong, University, China; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, USA)
Co-convener: Will Gosnold (Geology & Geological Engineering, University of North Dakota, USA)

Description

Geothermal data such as terrestrial heat flow, underground temperature, and thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, radiogenic heat production rate of rocks are fundamental to our understanding of the origin and the flow of Earth's internal heat. On the one hand, they carry rich information about the Earth's energy budget, evolution, tectonic history, thermal structure, paleoclimate change, and geothermal energy resource potentials on various scales; on the other hand, their measurements are subject to site-specific perturbations associated with geological, geographical, hydrological, and even climatic settings. This symposium is intended to provide a forum for the scientists and students to share their successful stories and discuss the challenges encountered in the development and application of various geothermal databases. The topics of interests include, but not limited to, the followings:

  • Update and reanalysis of the Global Heat Flow Database;
  • New development in the reconstruction of a climate history from borehole temperatures
  • Renovation of an existing geothermal database with advanced online database technology
  • Development of new databases of geothermal interests
  • Geothermal database in the assessment of the sustainability of geothermal energy development
  • Quality control and other challenges in the development of a geothermal database

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S26 Exploring connections between heat flow and tectonics

Convener: (Observatorio Nacional - MCT, BRAZIL)
Co-convener: Makoto Yamano (Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Japan)

Description

Understanding the role of terrestrial heat flow in molding tectonic processes in the interior of the Earth continue to be a major topic of interest in geosciences. The connecting links are multifaceted, spanning over such diverse topics as thermo-physical characteristics of subduction zones, brittle-ductile transition in the lithosphere, consequences of magma emplacement in the crust and thermal mobilization of minerals. Accordingly, the focus of the symposium will be on concepts and case examples on the interactions between heat flow and tectonic activities on local, regional and global scales. Specifically, this session call for papers on models and measurements describing terrestrial heat flux, characteristics of deep temperature profiles, consequences of magma emplacements at shallow depths, thermal mobilization of mineral resources and nature of interactions between subsurface temperature field and seismicity. Presentation and discussion of geothermal manifestations on local, regional and global scales are also welcome.

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S27 Geothermal energy: Ground source heat pump, hydrothermal system, and hot dry rocks

Convener: (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan)
Co-convener: Philipp Blum (Institute of Applied Geosciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany)

Description

Geothermal energy is one of the important renewable energy for sustainable society. This includes not only traditional deep geothermal system but also shallow ground heat pump, hydrothermal system, and dry rocks. In this session, we will present and discuss all geothermal energy from deep to shallow, and from wet to dry, on local, regional and global scales. This session calls for papers on observations, modeling, concepts and case studies of geothermal energy, in particular, interactions between deep geothermal system and shallow hydrothermal system, interactions between heat pump flow and surface conditions such as land use/cover, and interaction between hot dry rocks and fractured water flow, but not limited.

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